rue Francs Bourgeois entrance and entry to the garden of Musée Carnavalet
Museums

New Entrance for Musée Carnavalet

rue Francs Bourgeois entrance and entry to the garden of Musée Carnavalet
rue Francs Bourgeois entrance and entry to the garden of Musée Carnavalet

Musée Carnavalet has a new entrance on rue des Francs-Bourgeois. Located in the Merchant Drapers’ house  (1660), it is bright, roomy and faces the garden. The cloakrooms and lockers are at the old entrance area. Using the Francs-Bourgeois entrance, pick up your head sets and take the arcade across the garden.

The cloakroom (vestiare) and lockers are free of charge for individual visitors and groups, to store coats, large umbrellas, rucksacks, etc, but not large items, nor valuables such as cameras, money, identity documents, fur coats, etc. Suitcases are not allowed. Put in your coin, take the key. Your coin is returned when you set the key back in the lock. (See photos below in the gallery.)

New admissions desk in "old" archeology building at Carnavalet Museum
New admissions desk in Pavillon des Marchands Drapiers house

Carnavalet is the oldest of the municipal museums (purchased by the City of Paris in 1866) and is comprised of several buildings joined together to form the museum. If you are using Google, right click on “translate this page” to read all of the various histories written in French.

Hôtel Carnavalet (The website in French, English and Spanish)
16, rue des Francs-Bourgeois 75003 Paris
Telephone : 01 44 59 58 58

Metro stations: Saint-Paul, or Chemin Vert
Bus lines: 29, 69, 76, 96

Open: Tuesday to Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., except public holidays, Easter Sunday and Whit Sunday. Last entrance at 5:30 p.m. Ticket office closes at 5 p.m.

Some galleries are open in alternation. A schedule is available daily at the museum reception desk.

The public holidays are January,1 and May 8, Easter Sunday, Ascension Feast Day, Whit Sunday, July 14 and August 14 (Assumption Feast Day), November 1 and 11, December 25.

Carnavalet FrancsBourgeois Carnavalet entry FrancsBourgeois colleensparis Carnavalet entry garden colleensparis Carnavalet entrance desk colleensparis Carnavalet garden colleensparis Carnavalet walk way garden colleensparis Carnavalet coat check colleensparis Carnavalet small lockers colleensparis Carnavalet large lockers colleensparis Carnavalet visitorguide colleensparis Carnavalet interior colleensparis
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Musée Carnavalet has small lockers next to coat check. Deposit a coin, close, take the key and your money will be returned when you reopen the locker

This Web site and and its blog articles are for travelers to Paris who are looking for advice from someone who lives in Paris. These tips are "for Parisians at heart". Many people would like to visit, some can and some cannot - so I will help you enjoy a glimpse of the city and its surroundings. This project has been ongoing since 2002. Prior to living in Paris (since 1992) my European history began in the early 70s with three years in Wiesbaden, Germany. My next foray onto the Continent was in the mid-80s after graduation from the University of Florida (where I met Erik): traveling around Europe and UK with my friend, Margie, hitchhiking around and working in Ireland. After living and working as a journalist in Sweden for four years, traveling on boats, the Trans-Siberian Railway, local trains and planes took Erik and I around the world. I began working as a flight attendant in 1990 for American Airlines, based in Chicago. We moved to Paris, France in 1992 where I commuted between Paris and Chicago for my flight attendant/stewardess job. Finally my inner voice said "Stop!" and I left American Airlines six weeks shy of 20 years January 1, 2010. Now that is over and I am back working as a journalist and photographer full time on Colleensparis.com - My videos are posted on YouTube on the colleensparis youtube channel. and I am active in Toastmasters 75. Enjoy!